The ACLU is offering to help Britney Spears with her conservatorship case. Here’s why they say it’s a ‘civil rights’ issue

The ACLU is offering to help Britney Spears with her conservatorship case. Here’s why they say it’s a ‘civil rights’ issue

 

When you mix money and family

Although the pop star had requested that her father, Jamie Spears, not return as her conservator, a California judge ruled last week to extend her conservatorship as it is until February 2021.

By Valerie Jones
This combination photo shows Jamie Spears, left, father of Britney Spears, as he leaves the Stanley Mosk Courthouse on Oct. 24, 2012, in Los Angeles and Britney Spears at the Clive Davis and The Recording Academy Pre-Grammy Gala on Feb. 11, 2017, in Beverly Hills, Calif..
This combination photo shows Jamie Spears, left, father of Britney Spears, as he leaves the Stanley Mosk Courthouse on Oct. 24, 2012, in Los Angeles and Britney Spears at the Clive Davis and The Recording Academy Pre-Grammy Gala on Feb. 11, 2017, in Beverly Hills, Calif.. AP
Britney Spears has been trying to make some changes to her conservatorship, and she might have a new ally — the American Civil Liberties Union.

The ACLU tweeted last week that it would be willing to help Spears amid a court battle over the pop star’s conservatorship, which has been in place since 2008, according to HuffPost.

“People with disabilities have a right to lead self-directed lives and retain their civil rights,” the ACLU wrote on Twitter. “If Britney Spears wants to regain her civil liberties and get out of her conservatorship, we are here to help her.”

Last week, a judge in California ruled that Spears’ conservatorship would remain without any changes until February 2021, the New York Times reported.

The conservatorship gave Spears’ father, Jamie Spears, power to oversee her personal, financial and health decisions until he stepped down temporarily due to health issues last year, according to The Guardian.

Spears’ lawyer had said last week that the pop star was “strongly opposed” to her father, Jamie Spears, returning to his role as conservator, according to the Times. Instead, Spears preferred that her longtime care manager and temporary conservator Jodi Montgomery remain in the role, in part because Spears wanted to leave open the possibility to “seek termination of this conservatorship in the future.”

Britney Spears is trying to limit her father’s power in her conservatorship. Here’s what we know

What is #FreeBritney? Here’s why Britney Spears’ dad called the movement a ‘joke’
In an article the ACLU shared on Sunday, titled “How Conservatorship Threatens Britney Spears’ Civil Rights,” a staff attorney for the ACLU’s Disability Rights Project called Spears’ case a “civil rights/civil liberty issue.”

“We don’t know if Britney Spears identifies herself as a person with disabilities, or what, if any, diagnoses she has received,” attorney Zoe Brennan-Kohn said in the ACLU article. “But by virtue of being under a conservatorship, we know that the court has determined that she is disabled, and has stripped away her civil rights because of that disability.”

Brennan-Kohn also noted that conservatorship comes with its own risks, which can include financial, physical or emotional abuse.

“And even when there is no abuse, conservatorships limit a person’s ability to advocate for themselves, learn from their decisions and mistakes and grow and develop,” Brennan-Kohn said.

Jamie Spears has previously spoken out about rumors that his daughter has been under too much control, telling Page Six earlier this month, “The world don’t have a clue. It’s up to the court of California to decide what’s best for my daughter. It’s no one else’s business.”

The next hearing in Spears’ case will take place on Oct. 14, according to The Guardian.

FULL STORY

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Spelling error report

The following text will be sent to our editors: